A Public Art Project Symbolically Reverses Detroit's 'White Flight' A Public Art Project Symbolically Reverses Detroit's 'White Flight'
Culture

A Public Art Project Symbolically Reverses Detroit's 'White Flight'

by Zak Stone

May 18, 2012

The house made stops at locations relevant to Detroit's history as well as Kelley's childhood: Corktown, the city's historically Irish neighborhood; Dearborn, where Ford was founded; Wayne, where Kelley went to school; and finally Westland, where he grew up.

Now the project is about to find its final resting place. Beginning next month "Mobile Homestead" will be installed on a parcel of land behind the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, to be completed next year. The ground floor of the house will serve as a functional community space with free classes and a barbershop, while a basement designed by Kelley will provide studio space for artists and room "for more covert activities—what he called 'private rites of an aesthetic nature,'" according to Artangel. (Sounds fun either way.) The film trilogy premieres today at the Whitney Biennale in New York City.

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A Public Art Project Symbolically Reverses Detroit's 'White Flight'