An 'Iconathon' is Design-Centric Advocacy That's More Than Symbolic An 'Iconathon' is Design-Centric Advocacy That's More Than Symbolic
Communities

An 'Iconathon' is Design-Centric Advocacy That's More Than Symbolic

by Zak Stone

July 23, 2012

The Noun Project is collaborating with nonprofits that “infinitely know the problems that the river is facing,” including Friends of the Los Angeles River and LA River Revitalization. “We’ve asked them to come up with a list of concepts” to be translated into symbols. At Saturday’s event at LALA gallery in Los Angeles, the group will work with the public and civic leaders, to do rough sketches of the symbols in pencil and paper and analyze which ones work best. Then, Boatman will work with graphic designers to codify the designs and upload them to The Noun Project’s website, and into the public domain, by the end of October.

The hope is that local government will take notice and incorporate the symbols in design projects around the river. Even if the City of L.A. doesn't, "since symbols transcend language barriers, municipalities from around the world can take these things and use them for the rivers that run through their communities,” adds Boatman. In the past, The Noun Project has brought Iconathons to San Francisco, Chicago, New York, and Boston on topics like city services, nutrition, and democracy. They’ve created 60 symbols so far, which are free for the public and municipalities to download and use.

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An 'Iconathon' is Design-Centric Advocacy That's More Than Symbolic