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Dietary Supplements: Crop Tops, Cannibals, and the Requisite Mention of Guinness Dietary Supplements: Crop Tops, Cannibals, and the Requisite Mention of Guinness

Dietary Supplements: Crop Tops, Cannibals, and the Requisite Mention of Guinness

by Nicola Twilley
March 18, 2011

Is there any meat to McDonald's Sustainable Land Management Commitment?

In the unlikely event that radioactive fallout reaches the West Coast, people can best protect themselves by not drinking milk or eating dairy products.

And now a brief message from the Salt Institute (via NPR): Iodized table salt should not be used as protection against radioactive fallout.

The fact that iodized salt doesn't actually protect against radiation has not stopped Chinese shoppers from emptying stores of the seasoning.

"Hi, i am Franky from Germany, i will eat you." The Awl revists the Cannibal Café website, a time-capsule of human-flesh dining culture.

"Avoid romaine" and "go crazy with toppings." The New York Times offers valuable advice on how to maximize your salad bar bang for buck.

The Staten Island Lickety Split ice-cream truck: loved by children and oxycodone junkies alike.

Remote-control farming using Google Earth: Hyperculture allows you to use the tools of industrial agriculture to replant a corn field in Iowa with vetch, wild garlic, and winter rye.

A little bit of trivia to win you friends and admirers at the bar tonight: African countries account for five of the 10 largest markets by volume in the world for Guinness, as well as 40 percent of their worldwide profit.

And finally, check out Wired's gorgeous slideshow of strange agricultural landscapes, seen from space. The image above comes shows center-pivot irrigation near Garden City, Kansas, photographed by a USGS satellite capable of capturing infrared wavelengths.

Dietary Supplements is a daily round-up of what we're reading at GOOD Food HQ.

Image: USGS via Wired.

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