Does Folding Test Tube Meat Make it More Appetizing? Does Folding Test Tube Meat Make it More Appetizing?
The GOOD Life

Does Folding Test Tube Meat Make it More Appetizing?

by Nicola Twilley

December 11, 2010

In response (and only semi-whimsically), Schulze proposes borrowing the embedded traditions within a long-established paper art in order to lend equally flat lab-grown meat an aura of authenticity, care, and craft.

Not only could origami presentations restore some sense of expertise and cultural value to the cooking and serving of lab-grown meat, they might also solve the problem of resemblance. As Schulze puts it:

There’s got to be some way to communicate the nature of the meat. With food now, steak looks like steak. Chicken legs look like chickens’ legs.

How do we represent the history or memory of the animal? Origami plays a role in that too.

Of course, steak only looks like steak because humans have spent thousands of years redesigning cows through breeding and codifying their disassembly into culturally recognizable forms. But the current pace of technological change is such that we will only have a decade or so to shape steak's in-vitro replacement. Schulze's proposal is a provocation: how can designers help us adapt to radical shifts in food production by defining and create new patterns for how we eat?

All images copyright BERG London, used with permission.

+
Join the discussion
Recently on GOOD
The
Daily
GOOD
Sign up to receive the best of GOOD delivered to your inbox each and every weekday
Key & Peele destroy the media's ridiculous treatment of celebrity athletes. http://t.co/yoqT3p9RPt http://t.co/D2MZ6uV7wX
Does Folding Test Tube Meat Make it More Appetizing?