Does the U.S.-Russian Treaty Reduce the Threat of Nuclear Winter? Does the U.S.-Russian Treaty Reduce the Threat of Nuclear Winter?
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Does the U.S.-Russian Treaty Reduce the Threat of Nuclear Winter?

by Patrick James

April 10, 2010

If you're like us you're probably wondering whether the treaty signed by Barack Obama and Dmitri Medvedev actually does anything to reduce the threat of nuclear winter. It's a great question, and Treehugger is here with an answer:

Obama and Medvedev's signing of a nuclear arms reduction treaty is a very big deal. The biggest caveat is probably that the actual reductions in arms from each nation's nuclear arsenal aren't exactly huge—but nonetheless, it's very significant progress. After all, the chances of a nuclear winter occurring are higher now than ever before (while global warming is serious, the change in climate triggered by a nuclear winter would be immediately catastrophic), and this symbolic agreement sends a signal to the world that nuclear disarmament is possible.
The author argues that we still have a ways to go before the United States can have much credibility in asking other nations to disarm, but this treaty is a step in the right direction. Head to Treehugger for more information on the numbers behind the agreement.
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Does the U.S.-Russian Treaty Reduce the Threat of Nuclear Winter?