Five Ideas: Jennifer Daniel

Posted by Jennifer Daniel

Five Ideas is a collection of work from GOOD's favorite artists, illustrators, and designers. Some of the of the work you've probably seen, some of it has never been published. Each week, we'll showcase five pieces of work that tell a short story about our most creative friends.

Jennifer Daniel
divides her time between biking, twittering, and working in her studio in the Pencil Factory, where she specializes in multi-tasking designs and illustrations for fancy publications. Occasionally she art directs for a small independent publication called The New York Times—maybe you've heard of it? She is from Kansas.

Currency
Dustin Hoelster
curated a group of 10 artists to create gold-plated buttons for the Grand Opening of Busy Beaver Buttons in Chicago last fall. Some of these designs were mass produced on buttons and another mystery limited edition design was sprinkled in 30 different button-o-matics through-out the country.

Olympics Pictogram

When I get the chance to collaborate with the Graphics Department at The New York Times, I know it's going to be amazing. I've always wanted to dabble in animation, but it wasn't until I story-boarded this history of pictograms that I really got an idea of how much fun it is to make vectors dance.

The Pencil Factory Zine

I share a studio space in The Pencil Factory with Josh Cochran, Neil Swaab, and Alex Eben Meyer. Downstairs from us are a bunch of other artists, and for awhile now there has been talk about doing a collaborative project. Last fall we finally got our act together and published a series of 15 posters printed on newsprint.

An Academic Analysis of the Letter D



Post-Typography
asked 26 local, national, and internationally-based designers and artists to give short odes/declarations about an alphabet letter or typographic character for the launch of their excellent book, Lettering and Type. Like any good designer, I presented the case for a redesign … of the letter D.

Creation

Oh the humanity.

Inspiration I have no idea what I am doing and I often say or do wildly inappropriate things. My inspiration is no different—I'm not entirely sure where it comes from, but I live and work in one of the most over-stimulating places on earth, and my surroundings get into my illustrations one way or another. I love biking around New York; if you don’t notice things around here something is wrong with you. I love hearing my family tell stories. I thrive on limits—sometimes self-imposed sometimes from clients. Like MacGyver it forces me to be resourceful.