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Five Valuable Lessons Hollywood Can Teach Us About Transportation Five Valuable Lessons Hollywood Can Teach Us About Transportation
Lifestyle

Five Valuable Lessons Hollywood Can Teach Us About Transportation

by David Deutsch

May 9, 2013


It’s a bit clichéd, but cars really are part of the American psyche (Exhibits 1-6: The Fast & The Furious 1-6). And while we all want to be good, sometimes it’s hard to save the earth by walking and bike riding and train taking and so forth, especially when Hollywood offers so many far more appealing examples. That said, sometimes, being good means playing the cards that you’re dealt. So while I can’t imagine anybody making a movie that does for bike-riding or public transportation what Cannonball Run did for gas-guzzling cross country races, nonetheless, our friends in Tinseltown do have some valuable lessons for those who do choose more environmentally conscious means of transportation
Lesson One: Stay Alert 
 
The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974) and Tales From the Crypt Presents:  Demon Knight (1995): One of the disadvantages of public transportation, of course, is that you don’t have much of  a choice as regards with whom you share your trip (in fairness, the same applies to some extent to family car trips as well). There are, however, several common-sense steps one can take to eliminate the more egregiously awful seatmates one may find. For example, if you notice a group of men furtively speaking to one another and calling themselves things like “Mr. Grey” and “Mr. Blue,” you might want to move to another train car. On the other hand, if you notice that one of the passengers getting on your bus surreptitiously pours a little bit of blood from the Crucifixion onto the step of the bus, you might think “that should protect us from the Demon Knight,” or you might think “Great, just my luck to get stuck next to someone being chased by the Demon Knight.” Either way, in today’s security conscious environment, it’s good to know what you’re getting into.
 
 
Original image (cc) flickr user sryffel
 
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