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Four Infographics to Help You Get Back to Work in 2014 Four Infographics to Help You Get Back to Work in 2014

Four Infographics to Help You Get Back to Work in 2014

by Best of GOOD
January 10, 2014

As we come back from the scramble and hopefully reprieve of the holiday season, it seemed like the right time to (re)turn our attention to the work we have ahead. 

To kick off 2014 right, we pulled together a selection of work-related infographics to help you think about how much we work, how effectively we work, and how we might work (and live) better...

The Most Efficient Workforces in the World

Whatever we may be working for, our work helps expand our countries' economies. Each hour we work contributes to the gross domestic product. But by how much? This is a look at the GDP per capita of the countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, compared with the average numbers of hours worked in each country. While people may be working long hours in the U.S., in Luxembourg, an hour of work really means something.

Which Countries Have the Ideal Work-Break Balance?

Did you take a vacation this holiday season? If you're in the United States, that is only because your company generously allowed you a few paid vacation days. Unlike businesses in these other countries (all members of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development), U.S. companies are not required to give employees time off. Despite working some of the longest hours in the world, Americans get (and take) very little vacation. Even the famously productive Koreans have 34 required days off per year. 

Wellness Matters Within Your Workplace

On average, full-time workers in America spend more than one-third of their day, five days per week at the workplace. What if considering your health was a natural part of your nine to five? Not every company can install a gym or hire a full-time wellness coach to improve their employees' health. However, the idea of workplace wellness programs are gaining traction. Some companies give discounts on gym memberships or offer an online resource of health tips. Whatever the workplace wellness program may be, employers and employees are increasingly recognizing that it is possible to take simple wellness steps, like enhancing company culture or starting a walking club so that their productivity and overall happiness can be improved.

How to Stay Healthy at Your Work

In the early 1960s, nearly 50 percent of private industry jobs in the U.S. required moderate physical activity. Today that number is at 20 percent, meaning you're probably spending more time sitting and at your desk than ever. Studies have shown that excessive sitting can decrease your life expectancy, and by reducing time spent sitting to less than 3 hours a day you could add 2 years to your life. Use these easy exercises to keep your blood circulating and your muscles stretched throughout the day.

Cheers to a successful and productive 2014 from GOOD HQ!
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