Help Support Invisible Children: Bring The Polyphonic Spree to Uganda Help Support Invisible Children: Bring The Polyphonic Spree to Uganda
Poptimism

Help Support Invisible Children: Bring The Polyphonic Spree to Uganda

by Maria Popova

March 9, 2010
[
/vimeo]In 2003, a small team of Southern California filmmakers made a gritty documentary exposing the chilling reality of the child soldier epidemic in Northern Uganda, where for the past quarter-century rebel leader Joseph Kony has been terrorizing the community in a war older than the soldiers who fight it. The film, Invisible Children: A Rough Cut, received an overwhelmingly supportive response, with people scrambling for ways to help, prompting the team to leverage this enthusiasm. So they founded the nonprofit Invisible Children, an inspired social and political movement using storytelling to raise awareness-and funds-for Uganda's social tragedy, empowering the community to take charge of its own destiny. Over the years, the organization has become a serious player in demonstrating alternative ways of thinking about aid and awareness with the kind of dynamism and creativity that sparks micro-economic initiatives, sways politicians and helps rebuild schools.Now, Invisible Children need your help. They've partnered with La Blogotheque, the wonderful French music portal, to bring Yeasayer and The Polyphonic Spree to Uganda and use the power of music to raise awareness for the issue. The nonprofit is using Kickstarter to crowdfund the project, which will take $20,000 to bring to life. So far, they're just a little over halfway there in pledges and only have until 11:59 EST on March 11th-that's in only three days-to raise the rest, or else they get nothing at all.Pledges start at as little as $10-as the saying goes, many hands make light work. So in these next 70 hours or so, let's lend a hand in making these children's unjustly heavy load lighter.Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings, a curated inventory of miscellaneous interestingness. She writes for Wired U.K. and spends a shameful amount of time on Twitter.
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Help Support Invisible Children: Bring The Polyphonic Spree to Uganda