How Detection Dogs Are Sniffing Out Ways to Save Lives, Businesses, and Ecosystems How Detection Dogs Are Sniffing Out Ways to Save Lives, Businesses, and Ecosystems
Lifestyle

How Detection Dogs Are Sniffing Out Ways to Save Lives, Businesses, and Ecosystems

by Alessandra Rizzotti, GOOD Partner

November 10, 2013

This series is brought to you in partnership with Purina ONE®. These stories highlight how pets have provided creative inspiration in the worlds of technology, education, business, and beyond. Read more about how pets—and the people who love them—can brighten lives and strengthen our communities at the GOOD Pets hub

 Image via (cc) Flickr user Andres Peréz

Photo via Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission/Kathleen Smith

Image via Jason Dewitt/EcoDogs

Image via Auburn Research/Vimeo

Paul Waggoner, Associate Director of the K9 Detection Research Institute at Auburn University is training Vapor Wake Dogs to detect the scent trails explosives leave in the air, specifically through crowded public spaces, like the metro or malls. Working in a gas dynamics lab at Penn State, Waggoner was inspired by seeing how heat was directed behind a person as they moved. He trained dogs to detect and follow the scent trails that are left behind in the air. In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, this method could change how we ensure public safety, and has been deployed through the Amtrak police and TSA. Waggoner says, “Time and time again it’s been proven that dogs are the most capable detection tools.”

Top image via Flickr (cc) user iamtheo

Alessandra Rizzotti More Info

Alessandra Rizzotti has written for GOOD, Little Darling, Idealist, Takepart, Heeb, Smith, Hello Giggles, Reimagine, and has been featured on The White House blog for her work on the editorial series “Women Working to Do Good.” The editorial series she created for GOOD, “Push for Good,” helped raise over one million dollars for crowdfunding projects in social impact, and she helped launch impact campaigns with GOOD for Purina, GAP, Focus Features, Google, Apollo, and National MS Society. She’s also been published in three Harper Perrennial books with her six word memoirs, as well as four monologue books for Hal Leonard/Applause in collaboration with Grammy winner and GOOD member Alisha Gaddis. Her video art has been featured in Miranda July and Harrell Fletcher’s “Learning to Love You More” Gallery at the Baltic Contemporary Art Museum. In her freetime, she volunteers with CASA, beekeeps with nonprofit organization Honeylove, and edits children’s chapbooks for 826 LA. At Backstage Magazine, Alessandra currently strategizes and writes Twitter chats (in which she’s garnered seven million impressions) and edits casting notices, where she bridges the gap between filmmakers and actors.
Some recent articles by Alessandra Rizzotti:
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How Detection Dogs Are Sniffing Out Ways to Save Lives, Businesses, and Ecosystems