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Is Your City Running Out of Water? The Ten Largest Cities Facing a Water Crisis Is Your City Running Out of Water? The Ten Largest Cities Facing a Water Crisis

Is Your City Running Out of Water? The Ten Largest Cities Facing a Water Crisis

by Kyla Fullenwider
November 4, 2010

If you live in Los Angeles, Houston, or Phoenix you may want to get your rain collection system up and running. According to a new report by 24/7 Wall Street (which pulls from a previous study by the NRDC) these cities and seven others are in danger of running out of water in the "near-term future." The list includes:
10. Orlando, FL
Major Water Supply: Floridan Aquifer
Population Growth Rate: 26.8 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 48.35 inches
 
9. Atlanta, GA
Major Water Supply: Lake Lanier, GA
Population Growth Rate: 29.9 percent since 2009
Average annual rainfall: 50.2 inches
 
8. Tucson, AZ
Major Water Supply: local ground water
Population Growth Rate: 20 percent since 2000
Average Annual Rainfall: 12.17 inches
 
7. Las Vegas, NV
Major Water Supply: Lake Mead/Colorado River
Population Growth Rate: 18.6 percent since 2000
Average Annual Rainfall: 4.5 inches
 
6. Fort Worth, TX
Major Water Supply: multiple
Population Growth Rate: 36.1 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 34.01 inches
 
5. San Fransisco Bay Area, CA
Major Water Supply: various, including Lake Hetch Hetchy
Population Growth Rate: 20 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 20.4 inches
 
4. San Antonio, Texas
Major Water Supply: various ground water sources
Population Growth Rate: 20 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 30.24 inches
 
3. Phoenix, AZ
Major Water Supply: Colorado River Basin
Population Growth Rate: 21.2 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 8.3 inches
 
2. Houston, TX
Major Water Supply: Jasper Aquifer, Lake Houston, Lake Conroe
Population Growth Rate: 15.6 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 53.34 inches
 
1. Los Angeles, CA
Major Water Supply: Colorado River Basin
Population Growth Rate: 3.7 percent since 2000
Average annual rainfall: 14.77 inches
 
So why would an investment site be tracking water shortages in cities? From the post: 
The other important trouble that very low water supplies creates is that cities have sold bonds based on their needs for infrastructure to move, clean, and supply water. Credit ratings agencies may not have taken drought issues into account at the level that they should. Extreme disruptions of the water supply of any city would have severe financial consequences.
That is, buyer beware. If you are invested in a city that is not managing its resources responsibly it could have a long term impact on your portfolio, never mind the environmental consequences.
 
Image (cc) via Flickr user izahorsky
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