Secret Political Cartoonist: Remembering Dr. Seuss on His Birthday Secret Political Cartoonist: Remembering Dr. Seuss on His Birthday
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Secret Political Cartoonist: Remembering Dr. Seuss on His Birthday

by Yasha Wallin

March 10, 2013


His work at the paper allowed him to voice his progressive views, explaining that the publication "was against people who pushed other people around. I liked that." Seuss' cartoons challenged bigotry against Jews and blacks, and tackled everything from union-busting to corporate greed. While he was careful to denounce racism you'll notice that with Seuss' depictions of the Japanese—which call to mind all the stereotypes at the time—its clear his sympathies did not extend to them. A selection of Seuss' black and white illustrations have been immortalized in the book Dr. Seuss Goes to War and images are also available online on UCSD Library's site, which has digitized the original drawings and newspaper clippings produced between 1941 and 1943.

Images courtesy of the Mandeville Special Collections Library, U.C. San Diego
 

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Secret Political Cartoonist: Remembering Dr. Seuss on His Birthday