Why We Encourage Our Employees to Skip Work to Volunteer Why We Encourage Our Employees to Skip Work to Volunteer
Business

Why We Encourage Our Employees to Skip Work to Volunteer

February 3, 2013

 

In addition to hosting a couple of large fundraisers for nonprofits annually, we go the extra mile each year and get all 330 of our employees out on a full-day volunteer project. Over the years, we’ve been able to do everything from completely transform a large community garden in San Francisco to make over the building and grounds at Emeryville High School.

Every company should tailor its community service program to its own particular needs, but we’ve learned a few lessons along the way that might be useful to others. It helps if support for volunteering comes from the top so that managers and employees feel empowered and encouraged to participate. Letting employees select the organizations increases involvement and adds meaning to the program. Finally, setting a reasonable goal for the program (a target number of volunteer hours, for example) helps ensure your company can handle community service without undue strain on operations.

We’re all really lucky at Clif Bar to work for a company that cares a great deal about the community. It’s good for recruiting, it’s good for morale and it’s good for employees, but most of it all it’s just the right thing to do. It’s the way we believe in doing business.

We're challenging the GOOD community to commit our time to service. Go here to pledge 1 percent of your time—that's 20 hours—to being part of the solution this year.

Images courtesy of Clif Bar.

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Why We Encourage Our Employees to Skip Work to Volunteer